Program 2020

The ACA is pleased to share the following schedule of events. Workshops, sessions and events are displayed by date/time of their occurrence.

Please note!  Morning sessions will start at 8:30 AM and conclude at 11:30 AM. Afternoon sessions will start at 2:00 PM and conclude at 5:00 PM.

In addition to the intensive academic workshops and sessions offered at the ACA Annual Meeting, there is a variety of things to do and special events.  If you are a vendor that is hosting an event please complete this form to be included on the schedule.

All dates, times and speakers are tentative and subject to change.  


SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 2020

WK1: Applications of Small Angle Scattering to Structural Biology: An Introduction
Organizers(s): Jesse Hopkins | Kushol Gupta | Richard Gillilan

 

Sponsored by:

WK2: Crystallographic And Cryo-EM Structure Solution With Phenix
Organizers(s): Pavel V. Afonine

 

WK3: Introduction to Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Methods for Structural Analysis of Proteins and Complexes
Organizers(s): Corie Ralston | Michael Gross

 

WK4: Introduction to Diffuse Scattering Analysis from Single Crystal Neutron Diffraction
Organizers(s): Christina Hoffmann | Feng Ye | Yaohua Liu | Ross Whitfield | James Martin

 

WK5: Protein Crystal Crystallization For Neutron Macromolecular Crystallography: Practicum And Overview
Organizers(s): Joe Ng | Marc Giulianotti | Leighton Coates
 

NASM: New Attendees / Speed Mentoring
Organizers(s): Kenneth Childers

 

KEY: Welcome & Keynote Speaker

  

OREC: Opening Reception

 


MONDAY, AUGUST 3, 2020

1.1.1: Molecular Structure in K-12 Education
Chair(s): Andy Howard | Sangita Sinha
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac

Science education at the primary and secondary levels is increasingly organized around the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), a set of concepts through which scientific ideas and facts are disseminated. NGSS works through “Cross-cutting concepts”, “Science and Engineering Practices”, and “Disciplinary Core Ideas”. Among the Cross-cutting Concepts are Structure and Function; Scale, Proportion, and Quantity; Energy and Matter; and Patterns. All of these are excellent candidates for inquiry into molecular structure; and inquiries into structural realities are exercises in scientific and engineering practice. In this session we will explore how professional scientists can communicate their understanding of molecular structure in ways that implement and illustrate the cross-cutting concepts and science practices.

 

1.1.2: Facilities for the Next Generation of Material Scientist
Chair(s): Christine Beavers | Xiaoping Wang
Sponsoring SIG(s): Light Sources | General Interest | Materials/Neutron/Powder

Synchrotron light sources, neutron sources, electron microscope facilities all offer instrumental facilities which can enhance and improve crystallographic studies. When many crystallographers think about these facilities, they often immediately think of biosciences, but chemistry, physics and materials science have all benefited from these sites. This session is a chance for users to share their large facility success stories and for facility scientists to share the capabilities of their instruments.

 

1.1.3: Self Assembly in Soft Matter Systems
Chair(s): Tom Fitzgibbons | Volker Urban
Sponsoring SIG(s): SAS | Neutron

Multifunctional soft materials, block copolymers and surfactant molecules, have many applications in today’s world in both solution and in the form of thin films. By controlling the chemical functionality, processing conditions, and their environment, it is possible to control the resulting self-assembly process which gives rise to their unique properties. These properties include the formation and stabilization of micro- and nano-emulsions, use as detergents and rheology modifiers, and as templates for lithography among other uses. Characterization of the self-assembly process in solution, as a thin film, and/or at an interface are important to understand their structure-property relations. X-ray and Neutron scattering, particularly small angle scattering, are well suited to characterize these materials in a variety of environments. This session will include talks that explore the structure and morphology of soft materials that result from the process of self-assembly.

 

1.1.4: Microcrystal Electron Diffraction (MicroED) – Small Molecule
Chair(s): Brandon Mercado | Tamir Gonen
Sponsoring SIG(s): Small Molecule | CryoEM, YSIG

The field of microcrystal electron diffraction has rapidly progressed over  the past 6 years. Recent advances have placed microED at the forefront of small molecule structure determination. Several experimental protocols exist that describe the process of sequential sampling of diffraction patterns from nanometer-sized crystals while a sample is tilted in a transmission electron microscope. This session will be focused on advances in software/hardware and discussion of the results from microED experiments on small molecules.

 

1.1.5: Ion Channels

Chair(s): Leighton Coates | Natalia de Val
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac| CryoEM, Industrial

Sponsored by:

 

Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that facilitate the diffusion of ions across cellular membranes, despite appearances they are highly sophisticated systems responsible for controlling heart pace, regulating hormone secretion and generating the electrical impulses that underly the nervous system. This session will focus on new insights into ion channel structure, regulation, and inhibition made possible by new and established structural techniques.

Confirmed Speakers:

Sudha Chakrapani (Case Western Reserve University)
Yifan Cheng (University of California San Francisco)
Andrew B. Ward (The Scripps Research Institute)

 

LL-1: YSIG LUNCH: Open Discussion with Nobel Laureate Venki Ramakrishnan
Chair(s): TBA
Sponsoring SIG(s): YSIG

Students and postdocs are invited to join us for an intimate discussion with Nobel Laureate Venki Ramakrishnan.  Lunch is included.  Preregistration is required.  


SIG MEETING: Industrial

SIG MEETING: Canadian Division

 

PL1: Etter Award (Ando)
Chair(s): Brian Toby

 

1.2.1: Facilities for the Next Generation of Structural Biologist
Chair(s): Edward Snell | Jennifer Wierman
Sponsoring SIG(s): Light Sources| YSIG

Structural biology is rapidly advancing landscape driven by new technologies in existing facilities, new facilities coming on line, and resources than  support structural studies in general.  These session described facilities that enable structural biology and includes beamline developments, neutron and X-ray sources, and technologies that complement X-ray and neutron methods such as cryo electron microscopy. Similarly, high-throughput facilities that exist to help the researcher produce samples suitable for structural studies, e.g. crystallization are described. Besides the technical nature of facilities to enable structural biology, speakers are encouraged to describe the research opportunities that are enables, the training available, and how to gain access to the resources for efficient and effective application to research projects.

 

1.2.2: Microcrystal Electron Diffraction (MicroED) – Macromolecules

Chair(s): Brandon Mercado | Tamir Gonen 
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac| CryoEM

The field of microcrystal electron diffraction has rapidly progressed over  the past 6 years. Recent advances have placed microED at the forefront of small molecule structure determination. Several experimental protocols exist that describe the process of sequential sampling of diffraction patterns from nanometer-sized crystals while a sample is tilted in a transmission electron microscope. This session will be focused on advances in software/hardware and discussion of the results from microED experiments on macromolecules.

 

1.2.3: Communicating Science to the Public
Chair(s): Brian Patrick | Krystle McLaughlin
Sponsoring SIG(s): Communications | Canadian

Whether it be discussing climate change, public health policies, or simply conveying the impact of their research to the public, scientists need effective strategies to communicate and engage a broad audience. This session aims to bring together speakers discussing their experiences and approaches to scientific communication.

 

1.2.4: Advances in Fiber Diffraction
Chair(s): Joseph Orgel | Tom Irving
Sponsoring SIG(s): Fiber

 

1.2.5: In situ / operando: From Synthesis to Devices
Chair(s): Corey Thompson | Craig Bridges
Sponsoring SIG(s): Neutron/Materials/Powders

Functional inorganic materials are of great technological importance. These materials are used for electronics, computing, sensing, as well as for energy generation, storage, transport, conversion, delivery and more. With increasing concerns over climate change and depletion of natural energy resources, research efforts have blossomed in search of more efficient and sustainable materials. The synthesis and characterization of inorganic solids are at the core of materials science, with the relationship between the structural motif and properties facilitating the future design of materials with improved physical properties and performance. Essential to advancing technologies is understanding these materials at the atomic and molecular scale, and pivotal to achieving this is to study materials during preparation and operation. This session highlights recent efforts in the synthesis and analysis of functional inorganic materials utilizing advanced in situ and operando X-ray, Electron, and Neutron scattering.

 

SIG MEETING: BioMac


SIG MEETING: General Interest

 

PS1: Poster Session I
Chair(s): Louise Dawe | Tiffany Kinnibrugh

The ACA holds three evening poster sessions. Poster sessions are organized by the Poster Chairs and feature presentations covering a range of crystallography topics. Poster presentations may not seem as prominent as oral presentations, but they offer a terrific opportunity to interact with other scientists in your field in a structured way.

  

1.3.1: Open Exchanges In Crystallographic Education
Chair(s): Kraig Wheeler | Andy Torelli
Sponsoring SIG(s): GIG | Small Molecule

Crystallographic education is vital to every aspect of our profession from the training of current and next generation scientists to the potential for shaping public perceptions. This session offers an informal platform for speakers to communicate their approaches and techniques that promote the learning process of crystallography. The short format of this session (10 minute talks) will encourage speakers and attendees to freely share ideas on focused topics that range from innovative hands-on exercises, virtual resources, and novel must-have classroom modules.

 

EVENING SOCIAL EVENT: Rigaku Mixer
Location: TBD
Start Time: 7:30 PM

 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2020

2.1.1: How to Get the Most Out of Your Structures in Drug Development and Formulation
Chair(s): Kevin Gagnon | Elna Pidcock
Sponsoring SIG(s): Industrial | Small Molecule

This session will be a joint talk/workshop educational session. The format will be 10-20 minute talks followed by a 20 minute demo building on the talk (the demo may or may not be hands on for the audience). The content of the session will focus on software tools available to inform, promote, and advance drug development and formulation efforts through utilization of small molecule crystallography. The session will focus on the application of crystallography to complex solid-form problems including form selection, risk analysis, response to processing conditions, stability, etc. All talks must utilize externally available software tools (i.e. not software only accessible within one company) for structural analysis, informatics, prediction, or calculation; they must also include a demo of how to utilize the tool. For example, a talk might be on using informatics to guide co-crystal selection, followed by a demo of how to run the informatics screen. Audience participation is encouraged.

 

2.1.2: Advances in Software Methods and Tools for Cryo-EM
Chair(s): Xiaochen Bai | Zbyszek Otwinowsk
Sponsoring SIG(s): CryoEM

 

2.1.3: Quantum Materials: Magnetism, Correlation, and Topology in Condensed Matter
Chair(s): Jared Mallred | Ben Frandsen
Sponsoring SIG(s): Neutron/Materials/Powder

In quantum materials, non-trivial quantum mechanical states give rise to unusual macroscopic properties. Quantum materials stretch our understanding of the fundamental physics of materials and, in many cases, hold tremendous promise for eventual technological application. This class of materials includes topological materials, spin liquids, and other magnetic and/or correlated electron systems. The intriguing emergent phenomena observed in such systems can be heavily dependent on the physical structure, where even subtle details can have significant impact. This session will emphasize how crystallographic tools have been or can be used to uncover the structure-property relationship in quantum materials.

 

2.1.4: Frontiers in SAS
Chair(s): Tom Grant | Jesse Hopkins
Sponsoring SIG(s): SAS | Light Sources

Recent advances in light sources, experimental methods and computational algorithms have enabled exciting new discoveries using small angle scattering (SAS). This session is devoted to discussing the latest advances in methods and applications of X-ray and neutron SAS. The primary aim is to bring together cutting-edge advances utilizing SAS on both soft matter and biological systems, including time-resolved studies, contrast matching, dynamic and flexible systems, hybrid modeling, novel experimental apparatus and methods, and new computational approaches. This session will reflect the state of the art in SAS methods.

 

2.1.5: What I Learned from My First Structures
Chair(s): Larry Favello | Silvana Urcia
Sponsoring SIG(s): Service | GIG | Small Molecule

This session aims to trace the development of structure-analysis methodology in terms of the techniques that different generations of crystallographers had to master in order to carry out their first structure determinations, whether successful or not. The techniques and skills learned by each of us for our first structure analyses serve as a time stamp for the starting point of our work in crystallography. The evolving progression of these techniques as time has gone by is a chronicle of the changing practices in x-ray structure analysis, with their accompanying implications for crystallographic education. A high level of technical involvement by the user -- necessary decades ago when some current practitioners began -- has yielded to automated rapid-throughput analyses accompanied by quality control in the form of computerized validation. At the same time, subjects that were not commonly handled successfully years ago -- twinning, modulation, ab initio powder-diffraction analyses -- can be undertaken today. This session will showcase the ways in which structure analysis, and what one had to learn in order to do it, has evolved with time. That same evolution has transformed the user's point of view, for which the emphasis has changed from technical acuity with instrumentation, software and fundamental crystallography itself, to a stronger focus on the results and their implications in a broader scientific context. Contributions from all generations are welcome.

 

LL-2: YSIG LUNCH: Careers in Industry Panel Discussion
Chair(s): Chelsy Caryn Chesterman | Crissy Tarver | Angela Criswell
Sponsoring SIG(s): Industrial | YSIG

Are you curious about a career in industry? Join us for lunch and a discussion with a panel of industry professionals followed by a Q&A session with our panelists. Panelists from a variety of crystallography and structure-based industries will talk about their experiences and discuss questions from the audience. Lunch is included.  Preregistration is required.  

 

SIG MEETING: Small Angle Scattering

SIG MEETING: Fiber 

SIG MEETING: Service & Small Molecule 

 

PL2: Ronglie Award (Holton)
Chair(s): Brian Toby

 

2.2.1: Macromolecules Involved in Mental Health
Chair(s): Charles Stewart
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac | Industrial

 

2.2.2: PXRD with Multimodal & Multidisciplinary Approaches
Chair(s): Andrey Yakovenko | Vicky Doan-Nguyen
Sponsoring SIG(s): Powder/Materials

Sponsored by:

 

2.2.3: General Interest I
Chair(s): Brandon Mercado | Marc Giulanotti | Kenneth Childers
Sponsoring SIG(s): GIG | YSIG

General Interest sessions are the forum for topics of broad interest to the crystallographic community or for presentations that do not fit the specific theme of other sessions. All presentations are selected from submitted abstracts.

 

2.2.4: Crystallization on the ISS
Chair(s): Marc Giulanotti | Kevin Savin
Sponsoring SIG(s): Service | GIG

Many crystallization experiments in space over the past three decades demonstrate the value of the International Space Station (ISS) for improving molecular crystal growth. In 2014, the ISS National Lab began sponsoring its own series of crystal growth investigations, and many have yielded high-quality crystals for analysis. Most projects focus on structural determination for drug design, but others aim to improve drug formulation, manufacturing, and storage. Examples of repeat customers of the ISS National Lab in the area of protein crystal growth include Merck & Co., Eli Lilly & Co., The Michael J. Fox Foundation, and Oak Ridge National Lab. Some companies are additionally crystallizing inorganic compounds, toward advancements in materials science. Moreover, multiple workshops (2015 and 2018) held by the ISS National Lab over the past five years have produced actionable findings to help improve user success, including guidelines for informed molecule selection

The ISS National Lab is actively engaged in supporting projects utilizing the ISS for a variety of life and physical sciences crystallization experiments – organic and inorganic molecules. In addition to supporting current flight projects the ISS National Lab is working with the user community to outline the basic science requirements for a long-term crystallization program aboard the ISS.

In 2018 the ISS National Lab issued a new RFP for the use of ISS as a platform of microgravity molecular (organic and inorganic) crystal growth. Additionally, in collaboration with NASA, we have begun work toward enabling real time crystallization onboard the ISS National Lab and are releasing two new crystallizations this year, one of which utilizes real time crystallization.

This session will provide a forum for the following topics. How to access the ISS National Laboratory platform for all types of crystal growth. Hardware, methodologies, capabilities for microgravity crystallization – organic and inorganic. Physics and chemistry of microgravity crystallography. Results from crystallography experiments aboard the ISS National Laboratory. STEM Outreach Programs for space/ground crystallography.

 

2.2.5: Hierarchical Modeling of Functional Materials
Chair(s): Lilin He
Sponsoring SIG(s): SAS | Materials

 

PS2: Poster Session II
Chair(s): Louise Dawe | Tiffany Kinnibrugh

The ACA holds three evening poster sessions. Poster sessions are organized by the Poster Chairs and feature presentations covering a range of crystallography topics. Poster presentations may not seem as prominent as oral presentations, but they offer a terrific opportunity to interact with other scientists in your field in a structured way.

 

SIG MEETING: Joint Neutron/Materials & Powder

 

SIG MEETING: Light Sources

 

FREC: Fellows Reception

 

2.3.1: Would You Publish This?
Chair(s): Jeffrey Bacon | Matthew Brown | NA | NA | NA
Sponsoring SIG(s): Service| Small Molecule, Canadian

When is a structure too poor to publish? How much should scientific impact affect this decision? What are some recommended procedures for publishing poor quality structures? What compromises are involved in the publication of "low quality" structures? If you have ever asked yourself these questions, then share your insights, structures and problems with the small molecule community. Talks in this session will be restricted to approximately 5 minutes in order to encourage audience participation and discussion. All talks will be selected from submitted abstracts. Those who submit abstracts to this session may still submit a second abstract to other sessions at no additional fee.

 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 2020

3.1.1: CryoEM in Pharma: Structure-Based Drug Design Beyond X-Ray Crystallography
Chair(s): Seungil Han | Alok Sharma
Sponsoring SIG(s): Industrial| CryoEM

For long, X-ray crystallography had been the backbone of structure based drug design. However, since the advent of direct electron detectors in 2012 and development in data processing algorithms in the field, single particle cryo-EM has become a widely and routinely used structure solution method for difficult targets including integral membrane proteins. Pharmaceutical companies kept them in par with the development of the technique and readily expanded their drug design portfolios to non-crystallizable proteins. In this session, we are going to learn about efforts and success with cryo-EM which pharmaceutical companies have made in the past few years. The session will also talk about challenges and path forward with this technique.

 

3.1.2: Metalloproteins
Chair(s): Christopher Colbert | Jennifer Bridwell-Rabb
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac | Light Sources

Approximately 1/3 of all proteins bind some form of metal. These metals support extremely novel chemistry, electron transfer, and scaffolding functions in a broad spectrum of proteins. Additionally, metals are limiting nutrients for organisms meaning their uptake and transport is of critical significance. This session will present the broad array of important biochemical functions in which these proteins participate and how metals are trafficked into and within the cell.

 

3.1.3: Meeting the Challenges of Raw Data Deposition
Chair(s): Wladek Minor | John Westbrook
Sponsoring SIG(s): Data| Industrial | CryoEM | Light Sources

 

3.1.4: Cool Structures: Important Science from Small Molecules (Part 1)
Chair(s): R. Lee Ayscue | Jeff Bertke
Sponsoring SIG(s): Small Molecule | YSIG

This session aims to both highlight interesting structures of small molecules (<100 atoms per molecule) and bring to the foreground the science enabled by small-molecule structure analysis. Speakers will be selected from contributed abstracts. Submissions from students are encouraged.

 

3.1.5: Materials for Sustainability and Energy
Chair(s): Fernando Uribe-Romo | Karah Knope
Sponsoring SIG(s): Materials/Neutron/Powder | Small Molecule

 

TMT: Three Minute Thesis
Chair(s): Kenneth Childers
Sponsoring SIG(s): YSIG

These sessions are fully populated by accepted abstracts submitted to all scientific sessions by young scientists including postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate students. Authors will present a 3-minute thesis talk that gives a broad overview of key discoveries, methods, and/or applications of their research while minimizing technical language. Therefore, these sessions will be accessible to a general audience and provide a rapid overview of the impact young scientists have on the field of crystallography. Each presentation is 3 minutes with ONE PowerPoint slide and no questions. The 3-minute thesis completion will a qualifying round followed later in the week with a final session, where top presenters will compete for prizes. Please indicate your willingness to participate as a presenter in this session on the abstract submission form. Presenters will also give their full poster or oral presentation in the session to which their abstract was originally accepted.

 

SIG MEETING: YISG

 

PL3: Patterson Award (Petříček)
Chair(s): Brian Toby

 

3.2.1: Combining SAS with High Resolution Probes
Chair(s): Charl Jafta
Sponsoring SIG(s): SAS

 

3.2.2: Crystallography in the Geosciences
Chair(s): Bryan Chakoumakos | Nichole Valdez
Sponsoring SIG(s): Materials/Neutron/Powder

This session aims to highlight geoscience research in which crystal structure determination was a key component. Abstracts are encouraged on, but not limited to: crystal chemistry, petrology, mineral physics, mineral identification, biomineralization, and mineralogy in medicine.

 

3.2.3: Hot Structures
Chair(s): George Lountos | Nicole Fraser
Sponsoring SIG(s): BioMac | YSIG | Canadian

The Hot Structures session will feature talks selected from submitted abstracts describing the newest results from structural studies of biologically important macromolecules. Submissions are welcome that describe high-impact structures which provide insights into structure-function relationships, new biological insights and mechanisms, and methods development. Studies may include the use of X-ray crystallography, XFEL, hybrid methods, and cryo-electron microscopy.

 

3.2.4: Cool Structures: Important Science from Small Molecules (Part 2)
Chair(s): Louise Dawe | Matthew Brown
Sponsoring SIG(s): Small Molecule | YSIG | Canadian

This session aims to both highlight interesting structures of small molecules (<100 atoms per molecule) and bring to the foreground the science enabled by small-molecule structure analysis. Speakers will be selected from contributed abstracts. Submissions from students are encouraged.

 

3.2.5: Structural Analysis of Thin Films
Chair(s): Kenneth Childers
Sponsoring SIG(s): Materials | Neutron | SAS

 

TMTF: Three Minute Thesis FINALS
Chair(s): Kenneth Childers
Sponsoring SIG(s): YSIG

 

PS3: Poster Session II
Chair(s): Louise Dawe | Tiffany Kinnibrugh

The ACA holds three evening poster sessions. Poster sessions are organized by the Poster Chairs and feature presentations covering a range of crystallography topics. Poster presentations may not seem as prominent as oral presentations, but they offer a terrific opportunity to interact with other scientists in your field in a structured way.

 

YSIGM: YSIG MIXER

The YSIG is excited to host a Young Scientists Mixer 2020! Join fellow conference attendees and exhibitors on to meet and mingle. This event is an opportunity to connect with other scientists in a fun relaxed atmosphere. This event is held offsite and gives meeting goers the opportunity to explore San Diego. The mixer is FREE for registered students and postdocs but you must indicate on the registration form that you will attend. Preregistration is required.

 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 2020

T1: [TRANSACTIONS] Structural Science: New Ways to Teach the Next Generation (Part 1)
Chair(s): Joseph Tanski | Andrey Yakovenko | Christine Zardecki | Cassandra (Sandy) Eagle

 

4.1.1: Methods And Tools For Crystallography And Cryo-Em Sample Preparation
Chair(s): Eddie Pryor | Emiko Uchikawa
Sponsoring SIG(s): Industrial | BioMac | CryoEM

With the technological advancements in both X-ray crystallography and Cryo-EM, structural biology techniques are becoming readily accessible to all labs. Although we are witnessing many significant strides in this field, the main bottleneck for both methods is still the preparation of high-quality protein samples. In this session we will highlight the latest methods and techniques for protein sample preparation for both crystallography and Cryo-EM experiments.

 

4.1.2: [STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I] Protein Collective Motions Studied by X-ray Scattering and Diffraction
Chair(s): Steve Meisburger | Doeke Hekstra
Sponsoring SIG(s): SAS | BioMac

The macromolecules of life are often likened to elaborate machines, with many moving parts that must work collectively to achieve biological function. However, it has proven exceedingly difficult to understand how these machines work from traditional, static “snapshots” of structure alone. Thus, a new field of dynamic structural biology has emerged at the intersection of a diverse and evolving set of techniques. In Part I of this two-part session sponsored by Structural Dynamics, we focus on collective motions illuminated by X-ray scattering and diffraction. How are signals transduced within a protein? How are enzymatic activities coordinated in multi-step reactions? Are collective vibrational modes important for activity? This session highlights how cutting-edge X-ray methods, especially time-resolved SAXS/WAXS and crystallography, are providing insights into the dynamic nature of proteins.

 

4.1.3: Solid State Supramolecular Chemistry and Crystal Engineering (Part 1)
Chair(s): Dmitriy V. Soldatov | Wilhelm Maximilian Hützler
Sponsoring SIG(s): Small Molecule | YSIG, Neutron/ Materials/Powder | GIG

Sponsored by:

This full-day session will provide a platform to share and discuss recent advances and developments in crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry. Research in these areas leads to understanding how molecules interact in the solid state and how they assemble to form crystalline solids. The development of strategies to direct the organization of molecules within the crystal makes it possible to control physical and chemical properties of the solids. Contributions highlighting various aspects of this research are welcomed, including studies on organic, inorganic, and metal-organic compounds, single and multi-component systems, metal-organic frameworks and coordination polymers, as well as crystal structure prediction and computational analysis. Contributions from young scientists are especially encouraged.

 

4.1.4: Total Scattering: New Insights In Condensed Matter
Chair(s): Matt Tucker | Peter Metz
Sponsoring SIG(s): Powder/Materials/Neutrons

While crystallography has traditionally dealt with the average, periodic arrangement of atoms in condensed matter, it has long been acknowledged that deviation from ideality is critically important to understanding macroscopic material phenomena. As atomic structure characterization tools have continued to mature, an increasing body of work has accumulated documenting locally perturbed atomic environments, even in materials of nominally high average symmetry. These studies are often complemented by spectroscopy and microscopy methods to confer a nuanced understanding materials behavior and inform the materials science paradigm.
Beyond the classical examples of diffuse scattering, total scattering and the pair distribution function have been fruitfully applied to numerous contemporary materials science problems, including: ferroic materials, catalysts, strongly correlated electron systems, energy storage materials, as well as bulk/nanoscale variations on each theme.
New experimental techniques have also advanced local structure methodologies, particularly regarding advancements in grazing incidence X-ray PDF measurements of thin films, and advancements in the quantitative treatment of electron PDF data.
This symposium invites discussion on contemporary scientific developments enabled by local structure investigations of condensed matter.

T2: [TRANSACTIONS] Structural Science: New Ways to Teach the Next Generation (Part 2)
Chair(s): Joseph Tanski | Andrey Yakovenko | Christine Zardecki | Cassandra (Sandy) Eagle

 

4.2.1: Solid State Supramolecular Chemistry and Crystal Engineering (Part 2)
Chair(s): Dmitriy V. Soldatov | Wilhelm Maximilian Huetzler
Sponsoring SIG(s): Small Molecule | YSIG, Neutron/ Materials/Powder | GIG

Sponsored by:

This full-day session will provide a platform to share and discuss recent advances and developments in crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry. Research in these areas leads to understanding how molecules interact in the solid state and how they assemble to form crystalline solids. The development of strategies to direct the organization of molecules within the crystal makes it possible to control physical and chemical properties of the solids. Contributions highlighting various aspects of this research are welcomed, including studies on organic, inorganic, and metal-organic compounds, single and multi-component systems, metal-organic frameworks and coordination polymers, as well as crystal structure prediction and computational analysis. Contributions from young scientists are especially encouraged.

 

4.2.2: [STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS II] Conformational Ensembles of Proteins Studied by Cryo-EM and X-ray Scattering
Chair(s): Liz Kellogg | William Thomas
Sponsoring SIG(s): CryoEM | SAS

The macromolecules of life are often likened to elaborate machines, with many moving parts that must work collectively to achieve biological function. However, it has proven exceedingly difficult to understand how these machines work from traditional, static “snapshots” of structure alone. Thus, a new field of dynamic structural biology has emerged at the intersection of a diverse and evolving set of techniques. In Part II of this two-part session sponsored by Structural Dynamics, we focus on the analysis of conformational and thermodynamic ensembles by cutting-edge approaches in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and solution X-ray scattering. Recent developments in cryo-EM bring us closer to ensemble-like structural depictions that attempt to describe and better understand both compositional and conformational particle heterogeneity. Meanwhile, X-ray scattering allows for an unmatched view of a protein’s dynamic behavior in solution, and new avenues of analysis reveal meaningful structural information. This session highlights how cryo-EM and SAXS are uncovering the roles that conformational changes, intrinsic disorder, and structural variation play in protein function.

 

4.2.3: General Interest II
Chair(s): Brandon Mercado | Marc Giulanotti | Kenneth Childers
Sponsoring SIG(s): GIG | YSIG

General Interest sessions are the forum for topics of broad interest to the crystallographic community or for presentations that do not fit the specific theme of other sessions. All presentations are selected from submitted abstracts.

 

4.2.4: Physics and Chemistry of Matter Under Extreme Conditions
Chair(s): Yue Meng | Bianca Haberl
Sponsoring SIG(s): Materials/Neutrons/Powder

The application of extreme conditions such as pressure, temperature and field results in dramatic changes in all forms of matter. Under these conditions, matter undergoes phase transitions, displays rich new physical and chemical phenomena and can even yield new structures and materials not accessible in any other way. The aim of this session is thus to bring together the most recent advances and discoveries in both experimental and theoretical research that highlight these unique behaviors. Therefore, the session will address the many behaviors that are observed under extreme conditions. It will cover structural, electronic and magnetic properties, phonon and lattice dynamics, new materials synthesis, plastic deformation and melting. In addition, this session will also provide a forum for highlighting the state-of-the-art synchrotron and neutron techniques that enable new experimental research opportunities. Finally, it will also provide a platform for developmental ideas to expand the scope of future materials research under extreme conditions.

 

 

AMBM: All Members Business Meeting

 

BAN: Banquet

 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2020

WK6: Fundamentals of Single Particle Cryo-EM
Organizers(s): Wah Chiu | Gabe Lander


PLN2021: 2021 Planning Meeting
Join us to discussion workshops, sessions and topics for 2021 in Baltimore, Maryland!